Critical appreciative processes as a methodology for studying the production of consciousness

RIDLEY-DUFF, Rory and DUNCAN, Graham (2013). Critical appreciative processes as a methodology for studying the production of consciousness. In: Appreciative Inquiry: a method of working with disadvantaged people, St Mary's Community Centre, 17th March 2013. (Unpublished)

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Abstract

Appreciative Inquiry (AI) was developed as an approach to organization development that involves groups of people in discovering the 'best of what is' to drive social change. Several researchers, however, found that an exclusive focus on 'positive stories' is not tenable in practice. This paper explores their advocacy of ‘critical appreciative processes’ by reporting findings from a Big Lottery Research Project on the lives of Pakistani women living in Sheffield (England). Our findings track transformative learning amongst six Pakistani research assistants who ran AI workshops, Open Space events and conducted 1-to-1 interviews with thirty-nine other Pakistani women. They collectively deconstructed and reconstructed the meaning of social practices within their community, triggering both personal and collective processes of change. The paper’s value lies in the way Appreciative Inquiry, Critical Theory and Grounded Theory have been combined to theorise how critical appreciative process can advance study of the production of consciousness within a community.

Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)
Additional Information: The authors wish to thank the Big Lottery for a 3-year research grant (Grant Number: C756A981) to conduct this study. They would also like to thank the participants of the SCUTREA Conference 2012, The NCVO Research Conference 2012, and the International Social Innovation Conference 2012, for feedback on earlier drafts and papers related to this research project.
Research Institute, Centre or Group: Sheffield Business School Research Institute > People, Work and Organisation
Related URLs:
Depositing User: Rory Ridley-Duff
Date Deposited: 01 Nov 2013 10:12
Last Modified: 20 Aug 2015 19:06
URI: http://shura.shu.ac.uk/id/eprint/7454

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