Technology Used to Recognize Activities of Daily Living in Community-Dwelling Older Adults

CAMP, Nicola, LEWIS, Martin, HUNTER, Kirsty, JOHNSTON, Julie, ZECCA, Massimiliano, DI NUOVO, Alessandro and MAGISTRO, Daniele (2020). Technology Used to Recognize Activities of Daily Living in Community-Dwelling Older Adults. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 18 (1), e163.

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Open Access URL: https://www.mdpi.com/1660-4601/18/1/163 (Published version)
Link to published version:: https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18010163
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    Abstract

    The use of technology has been suggested as a means of allowing continued autonomous living for older adults, while reducing the burden on caregivers and aiding decision-making relating to healthcare. However, more clarity is needed relating to the Activities of Daily Living (ADL) recognised, and the types of technology included within current monitoring approaches. This review aims to identify these differences and highlight the current gaps in these systems. A scoping review was conducted in accordance with PRISMA-ScR, drawing on PubMed, Scopus, and Google Scholar. Articles and commercially available systems were selected if they focused on ADL recognition of older adults within their home environment. Thirty-nine ADL recognition systems were identified, nine of which were commercially available. One system incorporated environmental and wearable technology, two used only wearable technology, and 34 used only environmental technologies. Overall, 14 ADL were identified but there was variation in the specific ADL recognised by each system. Although the use of technology to monitor ADL of older adults is becoming more prevalent, there is a large variation in the ADL recognised, how ADL are defined, and the types of technology used within monitoring systems. Key stakeholders, such as older adults and healthcare workers, should be consulted in future work to ensure that future developments are functional and useable.

    Item Type: Article
    Additional Information: ** From MDPI via Jisc Publications Router ** Licence for this article: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ **Journal IDs: eissn 1660-4601 **History: published 28-12-2020; accepted 22-12-2020
    Uncontrolled Keywords: wearable technology, environmental sensors, autonomous living
    Identification Number: https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18010163
    Page Range: e163
    SWORD Depositor: Colin Knott
    Depositing User: Colin Knott
    Date Deposited: 05 Jan 2021 11:35
    Last Modified: 17 Mar 2021 17:15
    URI: http://shura.shu.ac.uk/id/eprint/27884

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