Models of personal development planning: practice and processes

CLEGG, S. and BRADLEY, S. (2006). Models of personal development planning: practice and processes. British educational research journal, 32 (1), 57-76.

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Link to published version:: 10.1080/01411920500402003

Abstract

This article presents an analysis of case study data from a project evaluating Personal Development Planning (PDP) at a large post-1992 university in England. The study was undertaken as part of a strategy of encouraging schools to build on existing experience while at the same time ensuring consistency with new national guidelines for the implementation of PDP across the whole sector. The aim of the research was to understand the models already available for supporting and developing PDP, and the views of different stakeholders about the place of PDP in the curriculum. The research was designed to engage with teacher beliefs in order to provide models of practice that could inform innovation. The study was based on interviews with staff and data were analysed on the basis of clusters of features to create models of different practices and approaches. Three ideal types of PDP emerged: professional, employment and academic. Each of the modes was associated with particular disciplinary domains, although none of them existed in pure form. The data suggest that pedagogic identities based on introjection and strong boundary maintenance displayed greater tension in relation to PDP than those areas already constructed on projection. UK moves towards PDP are part of an international trend. The great advantage of case study data, however, is that they allow insight into the dynamics of implementation at the local level and in this case the potential of generic initiatives based on projection to destabilise aspects of academic identity. New initiatives are more likely to succeed if they engage positively with teacher beliefs rather than being posed in contra-distinction to them; the first step, however, is to understand and theorise them.

Item Type: Article
Research Institute, Centre or Group: Quality Enhancement and Student Success
Identification Number: 10.1080/01411920500402003
Depositing User: Ann Betterton
Date Deposited: 15 Jan 2009
Last Modified: 09 Dec 2009 18:22
URI: http://shura.shu.ac.uk/id/eprint/215

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