Phenomenology and the dance culture: Women's perception of ecstasy use, clubbing and the body.

HINCHLIFF, Sharron. (2001). Phenomenology and the dance culture: Women's perception of ecstasy use, clubbing and the body. Doctoral, Sheffield Hallam University (United Kingdom)..

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Abstract

In-depth interviews were conducted with women who use ecstasy for recreation, mainly in the context of the dance event. The aim was to discover the meaning of ecstasy use, and its surrounding culture, for women in the late 1990s. A further endeavour involved disclosing how the body was experienced at the dance event and what this meant to the women.Existential phenomenological analysis led to the following key conclusions. The dance event is experienced as a social space that allows women to be themselves and find a strong sense of belonging. There may be apparent dependence upon the experiences surrounding ecstasy. But, the journey of ecstasy use allows alterations in attitude, and transitions in life, to be experienced, which the women view positively. The women use ecstasy for pleasure, believe themselves to be independent in their use, and do not view their actions as deviant.These findings are important to scholarly literature on female drug users because they redress the gender balance by presenting the specific experiences of women. They also have implications for social policy and health service provision, in the sense that this description of a social world enables understanding, enhances communication and, thus, betters education.

Item Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Additional Information: Thesis (Ph.D.)--Sheffield Hallam University (United Kingdom), 2001.
Research Institute, Centre or Group: Sheffield Hallam Doctoral Theses
Depositing User: EPrints Services
Date Deposited: 10 Apr 2018 17:23
Last Modified: 12 Jun 2018 15:35
URI: http://shura.shu.ac.uk/id/eprint/20721

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