The additional labour of a disabled PhD student

HANNAM-SWAIN, Stephanie (2017). The additional labour of a disabled PhD student. Disability and Society, 33 (1), 138-142.

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Official URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/096875...
Link to published version:: https://doi.org/10.1080/09687599.2017.1375698
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    Abstract

    This is a personal account of the challenges I have faced during the first year and a half of my PhD, solely due to my identity as a disabled student. I address issues such as a lack of representation when researching PhD life, the impact of the services which are meant to be there to help and the complexities of juggling the additional time-consuming events which occur when you are disabled, with PhD time, a home life and work. This is especially relevant in the United Kingdom at this time as the Disabled Students Allowance has recently been cut back, meaning there is less support available for disabled students, and with the increased marketisation of higher education it could be argued that there is less impetus for universities to support those who have non-standard needs.

    Item Type: Article
    Uncontrolled Keywords: disabled; student; doctoral experience; additional labour
    Research Institute, Centre or Group - Does NOT include content added after October 2018: Sheffield Institute of Education
    Departments - Does NOT include content added after October 2018: Faculty of Social Sciences and Humanities > Department of Education, Childhood and Inclusion
    Identification Number: https://doi.org/10.1080/09687599.2017.1375698
    Page Range: 138-142
    Depositing User: Stephanie Hannam-Swain
    Date Deposited: 11 Oct 2017 10:33
    Last Modified: 18 Mar 2021 01:20
    URI: http://shura.shu.ac.uk/id/eprint/16922

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