How useful are the stages of change for targeting interventions? randomized test of a brief intervention to reduce smoking

ARMITAGE, C. J. and ARDEN, M. A. (2008). How useful are the stages of change for targeting interventions? randomized test of a brief intervention to reduce smoking. Health psychology, 27 (6), p. 789.

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Link to published version:: 10.1037/0278-6133.27.6.789

Abstract

Objectives. To see whether the stages of change are useful for targeting a brief intervention to reduce smoking based on implementation intentions. A second objective was to rule out demand characteristics as an alternative explanation for the findings of intervention studies based on the transtheoretical model and implementation intentions. Design. Participants (N = 350) were randomized to a passive control condition (questionnaire only), active control condition (questionnaire-plus-instruction to plan to quit) or experimental condition (questionnaire, plan to quit, form an implementation intention). Their behavior and psychosocial orientation to quit were measured at baseline and 2-month follow-up. Main Outcome Measures. Theory of planned behavior variables, nicotine dependence and quitting. Results. Significantly more people quit smoking in the experimental condition than in the control conditions, and the planning instructions changed intention to quit and perceived control over quitting, but not behavior. Stage of change moderated these effects such that implementation intentions worked best for individuals who were in the preparation stage at baseline. Conclusion. Harnessing both motivational and volitional processes seems to enhance the effectiveness of smoking cessation programs, although further work is required to clarify inconsistencies in the literature using the stages of change.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: <p>ARMITAGE, Christopher J. and ARDEN, Madelynne A. (2008). How useful are the stages of change for targeting interventions? randomized test of a brief intervention to reduce smoking. <I>Health psychology</I>, <B>27</B>(6), 789–798. <br> </p>© American Psychological Association This article may not exactly replicate the final version published in the APA journal. It is not the copy of record.
Research Institute, Centre or Group: Psychology Research Group
Identification Number: 10.1037/0278-6133.27.6.789
Depositing User: Ann Betterton
Date Deposited: 06 Jul 2009
Last Modified: 20 Aug 2015 15:39
URI: http://shura.shu.ac.uk/id/eprint/124

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