Intensive family intervention and the problem figuration of 'troubled families'

BALL, Emily, BATTY, Elaine and FLINT, John F (2015). Intensive family intervention and the problem figuration of 'troubled families'. Social Policy and Society, 15 (2), 263-274.

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Link to published version:: https://doi.org/10.1017/S1474746415000469
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    Abstract

    This article examines how intensive family interventions in England since 1997, including the Coalition government's Troubled Families programme, are situated in a contemporary problem figuration of ‘anti-social’ or ‘troubled’ families that frames and justifies the utilisation of different models of intensive family intervention. The article explores how techniques of classification and estimation, combined with the controversial use of ‘research’ evidence in policy making, are situated within a ‘rational fiction’ that constructs ‘anti-social’ families in particular ways. The article illustrates how this problem figuration has evolved during the New Labour and Coalition administrations in England, identifying their similarities and differences. It then presents findings from a study of intensive family intervention strategies and mechanisms in a large English city to illustrate how this national level discourse and policy framework relates to developing localised practice, and the tensions and ambiguities that arise.

    Item Type: Article
    Research Institute, Centre or Group - Does NOT include content added after October 2018: Centre for Regional Economic and Social Research
    Identification Number: https://doi.org/10.1017/S1474746415000469
    Page Range: 263-274
    Depositing User: Louise South
    Date Deposited: 12 Jan 2016 16:40
    Last Modified: 30 Jun 2020 17:30
    URI: http://shura.shu.ac.uk/id/eprint/11324

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