Rethinking the impact of regeneration on poverty : a (partial) defence of a ‘failed’ policy

CRISP, Richard, PEARSON, Sarah and GORE, Tony (2015). Rethinking the impact of regeneration on poverty : a (partial) defence of a ‘failed’ policy. Journal of Poverty and Social Justice, 23 (3), 167-187.

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Link to published version:: https://doi.org/10.1332/175982715X14443317211905
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    Abstract

    For decades regeneration programmes in England targeted areas where spatial concentrations of poverty exist. These ‘area-based initiatives’ (ABIs) came under sustained attack, however, from the previous coalition government for being expensive and ineffective. This paper assesses this claim by re-evaluating past evidence on the impact of regeneration on poverty. It finds regeneration did relatively little to transform households’ material circumstances but significantly ameliorated negative experiences of living in poverty in relation to housing, community safety and the physical environment. This partially undermines the rationale for the policy shift away from neighbourhood renewal interventions toward the current focus on ‘local growth’ as the sole remedy for spatial inequalities. It also suggests a need for more nuance in wider critical accounts of regeneration as a deepening form of neoliberalism.

    Item Type: Article
    Research Institute, Centre or Group - Does NOT include content added after October 2018: Centre for Regional Economic and Social Research
    Identification Number: https://doi.org/10.1332/175982715X14443317211905
    Page Range: 167-187
    Depositing User: Richard Crisp
    Date Deposited: 12 Jan 2016 09:55
    Last Modified: 28 Mar 2019 16:01
    URI: http://shura.shu.ac.uk/id/eprint/11299

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