The SelfSTarT intervention for low back pain patients presenting to first contact physiotherapists: A mixed methods service evaluationfor low back pain patients presenting to first contact physiotherapists: A mixed methods service evaluation

STEVENSON, K., HADLEY‐BARROWS, T., EVANS, N., CAMPBELL, L., SOUTHAM, J., CHUDYK, A., ELLINGTON, D., JEEVES, B., JENSON, C., KLEBERG, S., BIRKINSHAW, H., MAIR, F., DZIEDZIC, K., PEAT, George, JORDAN, K. P., YU, D., BAILEY, J., BRAYBOOKE, A., MALLEN, C. D. and HILL, Jonathan C. (2024). The SelfSTarT intervention for low back pain patients presenting to first contact physiotherapists: A mixed methods service evaluationfor low back pain patients presenting to first contact physiotherapists: A mixed methods service evaluation. Musculoskeletal Care, 22 (1): e1876.

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Official URL: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/msc.18...
Open Access URL: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/epdf/10.1002/m... (Published version)
Link to published version:: https://doi.org/10.1002/msc.1876

Abstract

Introduction: Globally, back pain is the leading cause of years of disability. In the United Kingdom, over 20 million people live with musculoskeletal (MSK) pain, with low back pain being one of the most common causes. National strategies promote self‐management and the use of digital technologies to empower populations. Aims: To evaluate the uptake and impact of providing the SelfSTart approach (STarT Back and SelfBACK App) when delivered by a First Contact Physiotherapist (FCP) to people presenting with low back pain in primary care. Methods: Patients presenting with a new episode of low back pain underwent routine assessment and completion of a STarT Back questionnaire. Patients with low/medium scores were offered the SelfBACK App. A control population was provided by the MIDAS‐GP study. Patient Experience, outcome measures, healthcare utilisation and retention were captured through the app and clinical systems (EMIS). Interviews with five FCPs explored the experiences of using the SelfSTart approach. Results: SelfSTarT was taken up by almost half (48%) of those to whom it was offered. Compared to MIDAS‐GP, users were more likely to be younger, male, in work, and with higher health literacy. SelfSTarT users reported significant improved experiences relating to receiving an agreed care plan and receiving sufficient information. There were no significant differences in treatments offered. FCPs were positive about the app and felt it had value but wanted feedback on patient progress. They recognised that a digital solution would not be suitable for all. Conclusion: This approach offers an opportunity to empower and support self‐management, using robustly evaluated digital technology.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: ** Article version: VoR ** From Wiley via Jisc Publications Router ** Licence for VoR version of this article: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ **Journal IDs: issn 1478-2189; issn 1557-0681 **Article IDs: publisher-id: msc1876 **History: published_online 21-03-2024; accepted 01-03-2024; published 03-2024; rev-recd 28-02-2024; submitted 12-01-2024
Uncontrolled Keywords: back care, self‐management, assistive technology
Identification Number: https://doi.org/10.1002/msc.1876
SWORD Depositor: Colin Knott
Depositing User: Colin Knott
Date Deposited: 26 Mar 2024 13:16
Last Modified: 26 Mar 2024 13:30
URI: https://shura.shu.ac.uk/id/eprint/33458

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