Drug use in adolescence : the relationship between opportunity, initial use and continuation of use of four illicit drugs in a cohort of 14-16-year-olds in South London

MANNING, V., BEST, David, RAWAF, S., ROWLEY, J., FLOYD, K. and STRANG, J. (2001). Drug use in adolescence : the relationship between opportunity, initial use and continuation of use of four illicit drugs in a cohort of 14-16-year-olds in South London. Drugs: Education, Prevention and Policy, 8 (4), 396-405.

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Link to published version:: 10.1080/09687630110046144

Abstract

The study investigates the prevalence of illicit drug use beyond that of mere experimentation, examining the 'capture-rates' of cannabis, amphetamines, ecstasy and cocaine used in a cohort of 14-16-year-old adolescents. The data are drawn from eight participating secondary schools across three boroughs in South London. The transition rate from opportunity to use to actual use was most pronounced for cannabis (with a capture rate of one in five), followed by amphetamines, then ecstasy and finally cocaine. However, regular use as a result of having ever used was lowest for amphetamines and cocaine. Age appeared to be a protective factor since the mean age of those who had never been offered either of the drugs was consistently under 15 years of age. In contrast, early onset of drinking and smoking appeared to be a risk factor in those who are offered cannabis and go on to become regular users. While the study contributes to our understanding of pathways and patterns of adolescent substance activities, there are also powerful implications for the targeting of early interventions and educational initiatives for those with early onset and rapid escalation in drinking and tobacco use.

Item Type: Article
Research Institute, Centre or Group: Law and Criminology Research Group
Identification Number: 10.1080/09687630110046144
Depositing User: Hilary Ridgway
Date Deposited: 20 Jan 2015 10:18
Last Modified: 06 Feb 2015 15:51
URI: http://shura.shu.ac.uk/id/eprint/9275

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