The role of forensic medical examiners and their attitudes on delivering brief alcohol interventions in police custody

BEST, David, NOBLE, A., STARK, M. and MARSHALL, E. J. (2002). The role of forensic medical examiners and their attitudes on delivering brief alcohol interventions in police custody. Criminal Behaviour and Mental Health, 12 (3), 230-235.

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Link to published version:: 10.1002/cbm.499

Abstract

Background: Many drunken detainees are not receiving alcohol treatment, so the forensic medical examiner (FME) might be the only healthcare professional they see. This paper explores the possibility of British FMEs delivering brief alcohol interventions in custody suites.

Method: Twenty-five FMEs and 15 police officers were interviewed, using semistructured interviews and a snowball sampling approach.

Results: The main concerns expressed by FMEs regarding brief alcohol interventions were around role legitimacy, the suitability of the location and the state of the detainee. Several FMEs suggested that all drinkers would benefit from some intervention, especially young binge drinkers, drink drivers and those detained for domestic violence.

Discussion: These findings suggest that FMEs generally require a clearer understanding of the effectiveness of brief interventions, and the wider public health implications of such 'low demand' alcohol interventions.

Item Type: Article
Research Institute, Centre or Group: Law and Criminology Research Group
Identification Number: 10.1002/cbm.499
Depositing User: Hilary Ridgway
Date Deposited: 29 Jan 2015 09:12
Last Modified: 06 Feb 2015 15:51
URI: http://shura.shu.ac.uk/id/eprint/9224

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