What is recovery? : functioning and recovery stories of self-identified people in recovery in a services user group and their peer networks in Birmingham England

BEST, David, GROSHKOVA, T., SADLER, J., DAY, E. and WHITE, W. L. (2011). What is recovery? : functioning and recovery stories of self-identified people in recovery in a services user group and their peer networks in Birmingham England. Alcoholism Treatment Quarterly, 29 (3), 293-313.

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Link to published version:: https://doi.org/10.1080/07347324.2011.586270
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    Abstract

    The study was based on a peer snowballing method involving members of a service users group in Birmingham, United Kingdom, who were asked to identify and interview members of their peer networks who had achieved "sustained recovery" of one year. Two hundred and nineteen individuals were recruited who defined themselves as being in recovery, consisting of 132 individuals in medication maintained recovery and 87 in abstinent recovery. Those in maintained recovery were more anxious about using heroin and had lower self-efficacy, worse physical health, poorer quality of life, and more peer group members still using. Being older was associated with greater quality of life (rather than time since last use) supporting a "maturing out" hypothesis. Copyright

    Item Type: Article
    Research Institute, Centre or Group - Does NOT include content added after October 2018: Law and Criminology Research Group
    Identification Number: https://doi.org/10.1080/07347324.2011.586270
    Page Range: 293-313
    Depositing User: Hilary Ridgway
    Date Deposited: 05 Feb 2015 11:29
    Last Modified: 09 Oct 2018 10:36
    URI: http://shura.shu.ac.uk/id/eprint/9185

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