Enemy aliens, deportees, refugees: internment practices in the Habsburg Empire, 1914-1918

STIBBE, Matthew (2014). Enemy aliens, deportees, refugees: internment practices in the Habsburg Empire, 1914-1918. Journal of Modern European History, 12 (4), 479-499.

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Abstract

This article explores both the historiography and history of civilian internment in the Habsburg Monarchy between 1914 and 1918, with particular emphasis on the Austrian half of the empire (Cisleithania). It is often assumed that Austro-Hungarian policies towards enemy civilians and «enemies within» were simply a milder variant of a common pattern of intolerant behaviour by belligerent states towards aliens, national outsiders and other minority groups during modern wars. But this assumption is misleading, and Habsburg policies have much to tell us both about the collapse of the Monarchy in 1917/1918 and about the relationship between empire building, ethnic nationalism and the pursuit of military security in border regions more generally.

Item Type: Article
Research Institute, Centre or Group: Humanities Research Centre
Depositing User: Matthew Stibbe
Date Deposited: 11 Dec 2014 16:45
Last Modified: 19 Oct 2016 23:10
URI: http://shura.shu.ac.uk/id/eprint/9021

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