The progressive wave pump: numerical multiphysics investigation of a novel pump concept with potential to ventricular assist device application

PERSCHALL, Markus, DREVET, Jean Baptiste, SCHENKEL, Torsten and OERTEL, Herbert (2012). The progressive wave pump: numerical multiphysics investigation of a novel pump concept with potential to ventricular assist device application. Artificial organs, 36 (9), E179-E190.

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Official URL: http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?eid=2-s2.0...
Link to published version:: 10.1111/j.1525-1594.2012.01495.x

Abstract

This article describes the numerical fluid-structure interaction (FSI) validation of a new pumping concept and the possibility for application of a further developed type, as an implantable ventricular assist device (VAD). The novel principle of the so-called progressive wave pump is based on the interaction of an elastic membrane actuated by forced excitation with a surrounding fluid and the pump housing. By applying forced vibrations to one end of the membrane, a transversal wave builds up and progresses to the far end generating both a positive pressure gradient and flow rate. Among others, two axisymmetric geometrical configurations are possible, namely the discoidal and the tubular design. The first one has been built as a physical prototype and is experimentally investigated. In addition, a corresponding numerical FSI model is set up and validated against the experimental findings. Based on this validated numerical method, further numerical investigations are conducted focusing on the development of a tubular progressive wave pump concept with regard to its potential for application as a VAD in the future. To address VAD-relevant issues such as size, hydraulic performance, and blood trauma, corresponding numerical simulations involving macroscopic blood trauma models have been performed. Although being still in an early phase of development, the results are promising and indicate that the wave pump concept in its present state is feasible and can be further developed and investigated as a new type of blood pump. © 2012, Copyright the Authors. Artificial Organs © 2012, International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Item Type: Article
Identification Number: 10.1111/j.1525-1594.2012.01495.x
Depositing User: Torsten Schenkel
Date Deposited: 23 Dec 2014 11:43
Last Modified: 23 Dec 2014 11:43
URI: http://shura.shu.ac.uk/id/eprint/8887

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