Snapshots of scorpion venomics

ABDEL-RAHMAN, Mohamed A., HARRISON, Patrick L. and STRONG, Peter (2015). Snapshots of scorpion venomics. Journal of Arid Environments, 112 (Part B), 170-176.

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Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaridenv.2014.01.007
Link to published version:: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jaridenv.2014.01.007
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    Abstract

    Scorpions are particularly well adapted to survival in extreme habitats (especially arid and semi-arid environments) and their ability to produce and deliver venoms is an important factor in this success. Scorpion venoms are very complex mixtures of different proteins and peptides. Previous venomics studies revealed that each one of scorpion species may contain more than 100 different peptides. Scorpion venom peptides can be classified into two main types: disulfide-bridged peptides (DBPs) and non-disulfide-bridged peptides (NDBPs). The vast majority of DBPs are neurotoxic peptides that specifically interact with various types of ion-channels. The NDBPs have been shown to variously possess bradykinin-potentiating, antimicrobial, hemolytic, cellular signaling and immune-modulating activities. Recently, venom proteomics have been extensively applied in assessing the diversity of scorpion venom from various species. More insights about scorpion venom compositions were also gained through transcriptomic approach. It has provided an opportunity to obtain an overview of the content of scorpion venoms and to compare the relative abundance of toxin transcripts. More importantly, transcriptomics can reflect the biological processes occurring in venom gland cells. This review will highlight recent proteomic and transcriptomic studies to explore the venome of scorpions from different habitats, focusing on desert scorpions from North Africa.

    Item Type: Article
    Additional Information: Accepted 22 January 2014
    Research Institute, Centre or Group - Does NOT include content added after October 2018: Biomolecular Sciences Research Centre
    Identification Number: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jaridenv.2014.01.007
    Page Range: 170-176
    Depositing User: Louise Vickers
    Date Deposited: 31 Oct 2014 10:03
    Last Modified: 04 Mar 2015 17:39
    URI: http://shura.shu.ac.uk/id/eprint/8633

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