Differential effects of polyphenols on proliferation and apoptosis in human myeloid and lymphoid leukemia cell lines.

MAHBUB, Amani A, LE MAITRE, Christine, HAYWOOD-SMALL, Sarah, MCDOUGALL, Gordon J, CROSS, Neil and JORDAN-MAHY, N. (2013). Differential effects of polyphenols on proliferation and apoptosis in human myeloid and lymphoid leukemia cell lines. Anti-cancer agents in medicinal chemistry, 13 (10), 1601-1613.

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Link to published version:: 10.2174/18715206113139990303


Background: Mortality rates for leukemia are high despite considerable improvements in treatment. Since polyphenols exert pro-apoptotic effects in solid tumors, our study investigated the effects of polyphenols in haematological malignancies. The effect of eight polyphenols (quercetin, chrysin, apigenin, emodin, aloe-emodin, rhein, cis-stilbene and trans-stilbene) were studied on cell proliferation, cell cycle and apoptosis in four lymphoid and four myeloid leukemic cells lines, together with normal haematopoietic control cells. Methods: Cellular proliferation was measured by CellTiter-Glo® luminescent assay; and cell cycle arrest was assessed using flow cytometry of propidium iodide stained cells. Apoptosis was investigated by caspase-3 activity assay using flow cytometry and apoptotic morphology was confirmed by Hoescht 33342 staining. Results: Emodin, quercetin, and cis-stilbene were the most effective polyphenols at decreasing cell viability (IC50 values of 5-22 µM, 8-33 µM, and 25-85 µM respectively) and inducing apoptosis (AP50 values (the concentration which 50% of cells undergo apoptosis) of 2-27 µM, 19-50 µM, and 8-50 µM respectively). Generally, lymphoid cell lines were more sensitive to polyphenol treatment compared to myeloid cell lines, however the most resistant myeloid (KG-1a and K562) cell lines were still found to respond to emodin and quercetin treatment at low micromolar levels. Non-tumor cells were less sensitive to all polyphenols compared to the leukemia cells. Conclusions: These findings suggest that polyphenols have anti-tumor activity against leukemia cells with differential effects. Importantly, the differential sensitivity of emodin, quercetin, and cis-stilbene between leukemia and normal cells suggests that polyphenols are potential therapeutic agents for leukemia.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: Published as Gold open access
Research Institute, Centre or Group: Biomolecular Sciences Research Centre
Identification Number: 10.2174/18715206113139990303
Depositing User: Marguerite Lyons
Date Deposited: 11 Dec 2013 11:40
Last Modified: 19 Aug 2015 13:58
URI: http://shura.shu.ac.uk/id/eprint/7504

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