Uncertainty and resourcefulness in performance environments : a theoretical note

SMITH, L and DAVIDS, Keith (1992). Uncertainty and resourcefulness in performance environments : a theoretical note. European Work and Organizational Psychologist, 2 (4), 331-344.

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Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09602009208408551
Link to published version:: https://doi.org/10.1080/09602009208408551
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    Abstract

    The emphasis of this theoretical note focuses on the link between the concepts of uncertainty and resourcefulness in performance contexts such as professional sport and manufacturing industry. Integrative themes from sport, work, and organization psychology are highlighted. Rigid work organization based on job demarcation and inflexible role specification reduces personal control and instils perfunctory attention to work procedures. In contrast, the sociotechnical systems approach provides a framework for examining how localized control of variance in performance output may be developed through the recognition and promotion of tacit knowledge in individuals. Additionally, through consideration of the theory of learned resourcefulness, the self-regulation of goal-directed activities and a repertoire of cognitive-behavioural skills are suggested as important factors influencing productivity and health at the organizational and individual level. Throughout, the interconnection between these diverse theoretical perspectives is discussed.

    Item Type: Article
    Research Institute, Centre or Group - Does NOT include content added after October 2018: Centre for Sports Engineering Research
    Identification Number: https://doi.org/10.1080/09602009208408551
    Page Range: 331-344
    Depositing User: Carole Harris
    Date Deposited: 02 Oct 2013 13:22
    Last Modified: 13 Jun 2017 13:11
    URI: http://shura.shu.ac.uk/id/eprint/7395

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