Exploiting system fluctuations. Differential training in physical prevention and rehabilitation programs for health and exercise.

SCHOLLHORN, W, BECKMANN, H and DAVIDS, Keith (2010). Exploiting system fluctuations. Differential training in physical prevention and rehabilitation programs for health and exercise. Medicina, 46 (6), 365-373.

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Official URL: http://medicina.kmu.lt/default.htm

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Traditional causal modeling of health interventions tends to be linear in nature and lacks multidisciplinarity. Consequently, strategies for exercise prescription in health maintenance are typically group based and focused on the role of a common optimal health status template toward which all individuals should aspire.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: In this paper, we discuss inherent weaknesses of traditional methods and introduce an approach exercise training based on neurobiological system variability. The significance of neurobiological system variability in differential learning and training was highlighted.

RESULTS: Our theoretical analysis revealed differential training as a method by which neurobiological system variability could be harnessed to facilitate health benefits of exercise training. It was observed that this approach emphasizes the importance of using individualized programs in rehabilitation and exercise, rather than group-based strategies to exercise prescription.

CONCLUSION: Research is needed on potential benefits of differential training as an approach to physical rehabilitation and exercise prescription that could counteract psychological and physical effects of disease and illness in subelite populations. For example, enhancing the complexity and variability of movement patterns in exercise prescription programs might alleviate effects of depression in nonathletic populations and physical effects of repetitive strain injuries experienced by athletes in elite and developing sport programs.

Item Type: Article
Research Institute, Centre or Group: Centre for Sports Engineering Research
Depositing User: Carole Harris
Date Deposited: 02 Oct 2013 13:16
Last Modified: 02 Oct 2013 13:16
URI: http://shura.shu.ac.uk/id/eprint/7392

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