A comparison of locomotor pointing strategies in Cricket Bowling and Long Jumping

RENSHAW, I and DAVIDS, Keith (2006). A comparison of locomotor pointing strategies in Cricket Bowling and Long Jumping. International Journal of Sport Psychology, 37 (1), 38-57.

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Abstract

Previous work on locomotor pointing control during run-ups in sports has revealed the importance of visual regulation strategies, although most existing research has been conducted under a limited range of task constraints, mainly in the athletic jumps. The aim of this position paper is to extend understanding of control mechanisms by comparing research on locomotor pointing strategies under task constraints of long jumping and cricket bowling. An interesting question is whether differences in visual regulation strategies arise from differences in nested task constraints and availability of vertical reference information at the end of the run-up. Evidence suggests that long jumpers and bowlers use a prospective control strategy in approach runs, although the unique task constraints of both sports shape run-up strategies. In long jumpers, it has been shown that step adjustments can occur as and when needed by performers to ensure hitting the take-off board. In cricketers, a traditional inter-trial analysis revealed that despite a high level of variability in initiation points, due to the implementation of two visual regulation phases early and late in the run-up, bowlers seem able to reduce variability of footfall placement at the bound step to the same very low levels as long jumpers. A subsequent trial-by-trial analysis highlighted that bowlers spread adjustments of step length over the whole run-up and made adjustments only when needed and for as long as necessary. Data suggest that nested task constraints and the availability of vertical reference information at the end of run-ups in sport constrain implementation of gait regulation strategies. Ongoing research is needed to specify the nature of the perceptual variables used to guide locomotion in the cricket and long jump run-ups.

Item Type: Article
Research Institute, Centre or Group: Centre for Sports Engineering Research
Depositing User: Carole Harris
Date Deposited: 02 Oct 2013 08:11
Last Modified: 02 Oct 2013 08:11
URI: http://shura.shu.ac.uk/id/eprint/7373

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