Availability of advance visual information constrains association-football goalkeeping performance during penalty kicks

DICKS, Matt, BUTTON, Chris and DAVIDS, Keith (2010). Availability of advance visual information constrains association-football goalkeeping performance during penalty kicks. Perception, 39 (8), 1111-1124.

Full text not available from this repository.
Link to published version:: 10.1068/p6442

Abstract

A pressing concern within the literature on anticipatory perceptual-motor behaviour is the lack of clarity on the applicability of data, observed under video-simulation task constraints, to actual performance in which actions are coupled to perception, as captured during in-situ experimental conditions. We developed an in-situ experimental paradigm which manipulated the duration of anticipatory visual information from a penalty taker's actions to examine experienced goalkeepers' vulnerability to deception for the penalty kick in association football. Irrespective of the penalty taker's kick strategy, goalkeepers initiated movement responses earlier across consecutively earlier presentation points. Overall goalkeeping performance was better in non-deception trials than in deception conditions. In deception trials, the kinematic information presented up until the penalty taker initiated his/her kicking action had a negative effect on goalkeepers' performance. It is concluded that goalkeepers are likely to benefit from not anticipating a penalty taker's performance outcome based on information from the run-up, in preference to later information that emerges just before the initiation of the penalty taker's kicking action.

Item Type: Article
Research Institute, Centre or Group: Centre for Sports Engineering Research
Identification Number: 10.1068/p6442
Depositing User: Carole Harris
Date Deposited: 01 Oct 2013 11:15
Last Modified: 01 Oct 2013 11:15
URI: http://shura.shu.ac.uk/id/eprint/7326

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

View more statistics