Peripheral vision and simple catching: the screen paradigm revisted

DAVIDS, Keith and STRATFORD, R (1989). Peripheral vision and simple catching: the screen paradigm revisted. Journal of Sports Sciences, 7 (2), 139-152.

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Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02640418908729832
Link to published version:: 10.1080/02640418908729832

Abstract

The importance of effector visual feedback has previously been indicated using an opaque screen to prevent sight of the catching hand for the final 150–200 ms of a flight path of 850 ms in total. Attention was drawn to the finding that the ability to position the arm correctly in the line of flight of the ball deteriorated as a consequence of the number of trials without visual feedback. However, the use of only 20 test trials allows a possibility that the proprioceptive system may be able to re‐establish predominant control under conditions of prolonged visual decrement. In order to verify this notion, the number of experimental trials was quadrupled for 24 subjects of mixed sex in a replication of the initial paradigm.

The results provided preliminary support for the view that the positioning of the catching arm is more seriously affected by visual occlusion than the timing of the grasp phase. However, increments in accuracy of limb orientation were evidenced in all screen conditions, as the number of trials increased. The grasp component of one‐handed catching appeared to remain unaffected by the increase in experimental trials. The relative influence of skill level on catching errors was next addressed by comparing the performance of the six best and worst catchers in the group.

The results did not support previous research which found a relation between skill level and error type. The number of position, but not grasp, errors decreased as a function of task practice for both subgroups. Future investigations should, perhaps, focus on the developmental nature of movement control in one‐handed catching to obtain a clearer picture of this relation.

Item Type: Article
Research Institute, Centre or Group: Centre for Sports Engineering Research
Identification Number: 10.1080/02640418908729832
Depositing User: Carole Harris
Date Deposited: 01 Oct 2013 09:35
Last Modified: 01 Oct 2013 09:35
URI: http://shura.shu.ac.uk/id/eprint/7322

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