Enforcing the rights and freedoms of disabled people: the role of transnational law (Part I)

COOPER, J. and WHITTLE, R. (1998). Enforcing the rights and freedoms of disabled people: the role of transnational law (Part I). Mountbatten journal of legal studies, 2 (2), 3-30.

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Additional Information: This two-part article examines the role of transnational law in the assertion of rights and freedoms by people with disabilities. By transnational law we refer to law derived from sources that transcend national frontiers. For the purpose of our analysis, we divide transnational law into two categories: global international law (GIL), and European international law (EIL). GIL is derived essentially from the work of the United Nations and its subsidiary organizations; EIL is derived from the work of the European Union, and the Council of Europe. Part I addresses the impact of GIL; Part II, the impact of EIL. Although the articles are self-contained, Part I begins with some general introductory remarks that inform both Parts, as do the concluding remarks contained in Part II
Research Institute, Centre or Group: Law and Criminology Research Group
Depositing User: Ann Betterton
Date Deposited: 13 Nov 2008
Last Modified: 26 Aug 2015 21:00
URI: http://shura.shu.ac.uk/id/eprint/686

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