Studying the cutaneous microcirculatory response during upper-limb exercise in healthy, older, sedentary people

KLONIZAKIS, Markos (2012). Studying the cutaneous microcirculatory response during upper-limb exercise in healthy, older, sedentary people. Clinical Hemorheology and Microcirculation, 51 (1), 69-75.

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Official URL: http://www.iospress.nl/journal/clinical-hemorheolo...
Link to published version:: https://doi.org/10.3233/CH-2011-1510
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    Abstract

    This study investigated changes incurred in cutaneous skin blood flux (SKBF) in the superficial veins of the lower limb by upper limb exercise training in the form of arm-cranking in 14 healthy participants over the age of 50 years. Changes in cutaneous microvascular function of the lower leg were assessed using laser Doppler Flowmetry (LDF) during a 30-minute exercise session undertaken over 4-exercise periods. Both SKBF and Time to reach Peak Perfusion (Tmax) were improved significantly during the 2nd (e.g. 121 (± 107.2) vs 280 (± 269.1) and 171 (± 34.4) vs. 247 (± 38.3) respectively) when compared to the first exercise period, while values approaching initial levels in the following stages. The results indicate that the thermoregulatory and vasodilation mechanisms observed during exercise in middle-aged and older healthy people are different to the one appearing in younger age groups, suggesting a more extensive effect of the age-related structural changes than it was previously thought.

    Item Type: Article
    Research Institute, Centre or Group - Does NOT include content added after October 2018: Centre for Sport and Exercise Science
    Identification Number: https://doi.org/10.3233/CH-2011-1510
    Page Range: 69-75
    Depositing User: Rachel Davison
    Date Deposited: 20 Mar 2013 16:56
    Last Modified: 13 Jun 2017 13:06
    URI: http://shura.shu.ac.uk/id/eprint/6771

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