Drama and the Succession to the Crown, 1561-1633

HOPKINS, Lisa (2011). Drama and the Succession to the Crown, 1561-1633. Studies in performance and early modern drama . Ashgate.

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Abstract

The succession to the throne, Lisa Hopkins argues here, was a burning topic not only in the final years of Elizabeth but well into the 1630s, with continuing questions about how James' two kingdoms might be ruled after his death. Because the issue, with its attendant constitutional questions, was so politically sensitive, Hopkins contends that drama, with its riddled identities, oblique relationship to reality, and inherent blurring of the extent to which the situation it dramatizes is indicative or particular, offered a crucial forum for the discussion. Hopkins analyzes some of the ways in which the dramatic works of the time - by Marlowe, Shakespeare, Webster and Ford among others - reflect, negotiate and dream the issue of the succession to the throne.

Item Type: Authored Book
Research Institute, Centre or Group: Humanities Research Centre
Depositing User: Lorna Greaves
Date Deposited: 27 Sep 2012 16:12
Last Modified: 27 Sep 2012 16:12
URI: http://shura.shu.ac.uk/id/eprint/6292

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