Minocycline benefits negative symptoms in early schizophrenia : a randomised double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial in patients on standard treatment

CHAUDHRY, I. B., HALLAK, J., HUSAIN, N., MINHAS, F., STIRLING, J., RICHARDSON, Paul, DURSUN, S., DUNN, G. and DEAKIN, B. (2012). Minocycline benefits negative symptoms in early schizophrenia : a randomised double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial in patients on standard treatment. Journal of Psychopharmacology, 26 (9), 1185-1193.

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Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0269881112444941
Link to published version:: https://doi.org/10.1177/0269881112444941
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    Abstract

    The onset and early course of schizophrenia is associated with subtle loss of grey matter which may be responsible for the evolution and persistence of symptoms such as apathy, emotional blunting, and social withdrawal. Such ‘negative’ symptoms are unaffected by current antipsychotic therapies. There is evidence that the antibiotic minocycline has neuroprotective properties. We investigated whether the addition of minocycline to treatment as usual (TAU) for 1 year in early psychosis would reduce negative symptoms compared with placebo. In total, 144 participants within 5 years of first onset in Brazil and Pakistan were randomised to receive TAU plus placebo or minocycline. The primary outcome measures were the negative and positive syndrome ratings using the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale. Some 94 patients completed the trial. The mean improvement in negative symptoms for the minocycline group was 9.2 and in the placebo group 4.7, an adjusted difference of 3.53 (s.e. 1.01) 95% CI: 1.55, 5.51; p < 0.001 in the intention-to-treat population. The effect was present in both countries. The addition of minocycline to TAU early in the course of schizophrenia predominantly improves negative symptoms. Whether this is mediated by neuroprotective, anti-inflammatory or others actions is under investigation.

    Item Type: Article
    Research Institute, Centre or Group - Does NOT include content added after October 2018: Psychology Research Group
    Identification Number: https://doi.org/10.1177/0269881112444941
    Page Range: 1185-1193
    Depositing User: Sam Wharam
    Date Deposited: 27 Sep 2012 08:32
    Last Modified: 13 Jun 2017 13:02
    URI: http://shura.shu.ac.uk/id/eprint/6208

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