The contribution of injury severity, executive and implicit functions to awareness of defi cits after traumatic brain injury (TBI)

MORTON, Nicholas and BARKER, Lynne (2010). The contribution of injury severity, executive and implicit functions to awareness of defi cits after traumatic brain injury (TBI). Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society, 16 (06), 1089-1098.

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Link to published version:: 10.1017/S1355617710000925

Abstract

Deficits in self-awareness are commonly seen after Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) and adversely affect rehabilitative efforts, independence and quality of life (Ponsford, 2004). Awareness models predict that executive and implicit functions are important cognitive components of awareness though the putative relationship between implicit and awareness processes has not been subject to empirical investigation (Crosson et al., 1989; Ownsworth, Clare, & Morris, 2006; Toglia & Kirk, 2000). Severity of injury, also thought to be a crucial determinant of awareness outcome post-insult, is under-explored in awareness studies (Sherer, Boake, Levin, Silver, Ringholz, & Walter, 1998 ). The present study measured the contribution of injury severity, IQ, mood state, executive and implicit functions to awareness in head-injured patients assigned to moderate/severe head-injured groups using several awareness, executive, and implicit measures. Severe injuries resulted in greater impairments across most awareness, executive and implicit measures compared with moderate injuries, although deficits were still seen in the moderate group. Hierarchical regression results showed that severity of injury, IQ, mood state, executive and implicit functions made signifi cant unique contributions to selective aspects of awareness. Future models of awareness should account for both implicit and executive contributions to awareness and the possibility that both are vulnerable to disruption after neuropathology. ( JINS , 2010, 16 , 1– 10 .)

Item Type: Article
Research Institute, Centre or Group: Psychology Research Group
Identification Number: 10.1017/S1355617710000925
Depositing User: Lynne Barker
Date Deposited: 24 Sep 2012 14:59
Last Modified: 19 Aug 2015 21:18
URI: http://shura.shu.ac.uk/id/eprint/6061

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