Reisen, a solo exhibition at Galerie Bugdahn und Kaimer, Düsseldorf

KIVLAND, Sharon (2009). Reisen, a solo exhibition at Galerie Bugdahn und Kaimer, Düsseldorf. [Show/Exhibition]

[img]
Preview
Image (JPEG)
SK_View_1.jpg

Download (118kB) | Preview
[img]
Preview
Image (JPEG)
SK_View_2.jpg

Download (126kB) | Preview
[img]
Preview
Image (JPEG)
SK_View_3.jpg

Download (125kB) | Preview
[img]
Preview
Image (JPEG)
SK_View_4.jpg

Download (125kB) | Preview
[img]
Preview
Image (JPEG)
SK_View_5.jpg

Download (81kB) | Preview
[img]
Preview
Image (JPEG)
SK_View_7.jpg

Download (97kB) | Preview
[img]
Preview
Image (JPEG)
SK_View_12.jpg

Download (111kB) | Preview
[img]
Preview
Image (JPEG)
SK_View_15.jpg

Download (157kB) | Preview
[img]
Preview
Image (JPEG)
SK_Train_10.jpg

Download (97kB) | Preview
[img]
Preview
Image (JPEG)
SK_Mountain_9.jpg

Download (132kB) | Preview
[img]
Preview
Image (JPEG)
SK_Lake_4.jpg

Download (142kB) | Preview
Official URL: http://www.bugdahnundkaimer.com

Abstract

In her work, Sharon Kivland investigates how our lives are governed by systems of order that complement, overlap and contradict one another while undergoing periods of change continually. Spheres such as language, gender, time/space, art philosophy, politics, nature, history, economy are involved. In “L’autre Corps”, her first solo show in Germany at Galerie Bugdahn und Kaimer in 2003, the focus of this approach were represented by the identity of woman and her body. The gallery now presents new works by the artist. In several series of photographic and re-photographic pieces Sharon Kivland explores “Reisen” (Travelling). “Freud Dreams of Rome” from 2007 is a series of eleven photographic etchings, with an edition of three (one set framed, two portfolios) and were exhibited 2007/08 at the Freud Museum, London. When Sigmund Freud arrived in Rome for the first time in 1901 he already been dreaming of the city for many years. In the Interpretation of Dreams, Freud writes: ‘A dream is a fulfilment of a wish’. Four dreams expressed his still unfulfilled longing for Rome. In each of them, his dream view of the city is curiously distorted – his ‘Rome’ is set in Alpine scenery or full of German posters. Freud did not take photographs while on holiday, though he did buy engravings. Sharon Kivland’s etchings show us a Rome we have never seen before. Or one we never consciously recognized. The views are taken from guidebooks to Rome, contemporary with Freud’s seven visits. These are views of a city any tourist might see – but she has captured them empty of human activity, as if there were night scenes in broad daylight. They are oddly cropped. Uninhabited, they reveal only impasses, dark courtyards, angles of buildings. These empty arches and cryptic doorways indicate a concealed life. Freud’s dream Rome was an unreal city, made up of his fears, wishes, scraps of memory from the previous day. Sharon Kivland’s Rome is the real city, but this place is an expression of the hidden activities of the mind. “Reisen I”, 2009, ten silver print photographs, framed, each unique, continuing series. From the artist’s collection of postcards of European steam trains. The view is largely removed, leaving a blurred background to the evocative billow of steam. She imagine Freud and his brother Alex travelling across Europe, as their hearts turn to south each spring and summer. Alex had a remarkable grasp of the train time-tables of the time. “Reisen II”, 2009, ten silver print photographs, framed, each unique, continuing series. From the artist’s collection of postcards of snow on mountains, various countries. “Reisen III”, 2009, six silver print photographs, framed, each unique, continuing series. From the artist’s collection of postcards of Swiss lakes. “Reisen IV”, 2009, three screenprints, each an edition of three, framed. Swiss hotels advertisements, circa 1907. “Mes Bonnes Anneés”, 2009, water colour on Arches paper, original postcard, fifteen framed works, each unique, continuing series. Watercolour copies of postcards sent in France to offer best wishes for the New Year. The artist has worked from memory, looking to the card for a long time, trying to register the view depicted, then has turned the card over, reading the inscription, sent to a relative or friend. The images usually depict snowy scenes, with a house, a church, a forest, perhaps a path; the rather idyllic views take on an aspe

Item Type: Show/Exhibition
Research Institute, Centre or Group: Cultural Communication and Computing Research Institute > Art and Design Research Centre
Depositing User: Sharon Kivland
Date Deposited: 25 Sep 2012 12:59
Last Modified: 11 Feb 2014 12:31
URI: http://shura.shu.ac.uk/id/eprint/5472

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

View more statistics