Differentiating the effects of negative state on optimism and the implicit perception of everyday injury risk

MORGAN, James I and GARTHWAITE, Joe (2012). Differentiating the effects of negative state on optimism and the implicit perception of everyday injury risk. In: ANDERSON, Martin, (ed.) Contemporary Ergonomics and Human Factors 2012 : Proceedings of the international conference on Ergonomics and Human Factors 2012, Blackpool, UK, 16-19 April 2012. CRC Press, 181-188.

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    Abstract

    To date no research has examined the effects of negative state on the perception of everyday injury risk. Instead, studies have focussed more broadly on the relationship between mood and self- reported optimism. The present study had two aims. Firstly, to assess the effect of incidental anxiety on implicit injury risk perception using a modified Implicit Association Test (IAT). Secondly, it sought to compare any effect with that on a conventional measure of risk perception (optimism). In line with previous research, anxious participants perceived more risk (were less optimistic). In contrast, there was no significant correlation between anxiety and the implicit perception of everyday injury risk. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.

    Item Type: Book Section
    Research Institute, Centre or Group: Psychology Research Group
    Depositing User: Jim Morgan
    Date Deposited: 05 Jul 2012 09:13
    Last Modified: 05 Jul 2012 09:13
    URI: http://shura.shu.ac.uk/id/eprint/5454

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