"Booster" interventions to sustain increases in physical activity in middle-aged adults in deprived urban neighbourhoods: internal pilot and feasibility study

SCOTT, Emma J., DIMAIRO, Munyaradzi, HIND, Daniel, GOYDER, Elizabeth, COPELAND, Robert J., BRECKON, Jeff D., CRANK, Helen, WALTERS, Stephen J., LOBAN, Amanda and COOPER, Cindy L. (2011). "Booster" interventions to sustain increases in physical activity in middle-aged adults in deprived urban neighbourhoods: internal pilot and feasibility study. BMC Public Health, 11 (129), 1-11.

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Link to published version:: https://doi.org/10.1186/1471-2458-11-129
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    Abstract

    Background Systematic reviews have identified a range of brief interventions which increase physical activity in previously sedentary people. A randomised controlled trial is needed to assess whether providing motivational interviewing, three months after giving initial advice, sustains physical activity levels in those who recently became physically active. This paper reports the results of an internal pilot study designed to test the feasibility of the study in terms of recruitment, per protocol delivery of the intervention and retention at three months. Methods Participants were: aged 40-64 years; resident in deprived areas of Sheffield, UK; and, had recently become physically active as a result of using a brief intervention following an invitation from a mass mailout. Interventions: Motivational Interviewing 'boosters' aimed at sustaining change in physical activity status delivered face-to-face or over the telephone compared with no further intervention. Outcomes of the feasibility study: recruitment of 60 participants from mailout of 3,300; retention of 45 participants with 3-month follow-up accelerometry measurements; 70% of those randomised to boosters receiving intervention per protocol. Sample size and power were recalculated using the accelerometry data collected. Results Forty-seven participants were randomised (78% of the feasibility target); 37 participants were retained at three months, 29 with at least four days of accelerometry data (64% of the feasibility target); 79% of those allocated boosters received them per protocol (surpassing the feasibility target). The proposed sample size of 600 was confirmed as appropriate and power is expected to be sufficient to detect a difference between groups. Conclusions The main study will continue with the original recruitment target of 600 participants but to ensure feasibility, it is necessary to increase recruitment and improve the numbers of those followed-up who have evaluable data. Strategies will include increasing the number of initial invitations sent out and improving the training of research assistants and participants in the positioning of the accelerometer. Trial Registration ISRCTN: ISRCTN56495859, ClinicalTrials (NCT): NCT00836459

    Item Type: Article
    Research Institute, Centre or Group - Does NOT include content added after October 2018: Centre for Sport and Exercise Science
    Identification Number: https://doi.org/10.1186/1471-2458-11-129
    Page Range: 1-11
    Depositing User: Rachel Davison
    Date Deposited: 15 Jun 2011 11:42
    Last Modified: 13 Jun 2017 12:49
    URI: http://shura.shu.ac.uk/id/eprint/3678

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