A comparison between conventional macroscopic and novel microscopic scanning electrochemical methods to evaluate galvanic corrosion

AKID, Robert and MILLS, D. J. (2001). A comparison between conventional macroscopic and novel microscopic scanning electrochemical methods to evaluate galvanic corrosion. Corrosion science, 43 (7), 1203-1216.

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Link to published version:: https://doi.org/10.1016/S0010-938X(00)00091-3
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    Abstract

    The scanning reference electrode technique (SRET) has been used to examine corrosion in a galvanic ‘Kelocouple’ system, being that of an explosively bonded joint comprising a tri-metallic sandwich of steel/aluminium/aluminium alloy. Quantitative results of local current densities in 4% sea water at room temperature have been obtained. These have been compared with results from two conventional macroscopic techniques for measuring galvanic current, namely zero resistance ammetry and polarisation curves. The SRET results were found to be at least an order of magnitude higher than the average results obtained using the macroscopic methods. Comparison between SRET current densities and corrosion (as obtained by the amount of aluminium in solution) showed good agreement. Whether attack predominated on the aluminium (nearer the steel) or the aluminium alloy (further from the steel) depended on the concentration of the sea water.

    Item Type: Article
    Additional Information: Copyright © Elsevier B.V.
    Research Institute, Centre or Group - Does NOT include content added after October 2018: Materials and Engineering Research Institute > Structural Materials and Integrity Research Centre > Centre for Corrosion Technology
    Identification Number: https://doi.org/10.1016/S0010-938X(00)00091-3
    Page Range: 1203-1216
    Depositing User: Ann Betterton
    Date Deposited: 10 Jan 2008
    Last Modified: 19 Mar 2021 01:00
    URI: http://shura.shu.ac.uk/id/eprint/352

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