Movement models from sports provide representative task constraints for studying adaptive behavior in human movement systems

DAVIDS, K, BUTTON, C, ARAUJO, D, RENSHAW, I and HRISTOVSKI, R (2006). Movement models from sports provide representative task constraints for studying adaptive behavior in human movement systems. Adaptive Behavior, 14 (1), 73-95.

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Official URL: http://adb.sagepub.com/
Link to published version:: 10.1177/105971230601400103

Abstract

Researchers studying adaptive behavior in human movement systems have traditionally employed simplified, laboratory-based movement models in an effort to conserve experimental rigor. Brunswikian psychology raises questions over the representativeness of many of these popular experimental models for studying how movements are coordinated with events, objects, and surfaces of dynamic environments. In this article we argue that sports provide rich ecological constraints for representative task design in modeling the complex interactions of human performers with their environments. Adopting a functionalist perspective enriched by ideas from ecological psychology and nonlinear dynamics, we consider data from exemplar movement models in basketball and boxing to support this contention. We show that this preference for movement models from sports, although not completely novel, has accelerated over recent years, mainly due to the theoretical re-emphasis on studying the interaction of individual and task constraints. The implications of using such applied models of move ment behavior in studying the design of natural and artificial systems are also discussed.

Item Type: Article
Research Institute, Centre or Group: Centre for Sports Engineering Research
Identification Number: 10.1177/105971230601400103
Depositing User: Carole Harris
Date Deposited: 14 Apr 2011 13:29
Last Modified: 14 Apr 2011 13:29
URI: http://shura.shu.ac.uk/id/eprint/3353

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