Declarative knowledge in sport: a by-product of experience or a characteristic of expertise?

WILLIAMS, A M and DAVIDS, K (1995). Declarative knowledge in sport: a by-product of experience or a characteristic of expertise? Journal of sport and exercise psychology, 17 (3), 259-275.

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Official URL: http://journals.humankinetics.com/jsep

Abstract

This research examined whether skilled sports performers' enhanced declarative knowledge base is a by-product of experience or a characteristic of expertise. Experienced high-skill (n = 12) and low-skill (n = 12) soccer players and physically disabled spectators (n = 12) were tested on soccer recall, recognition, and anticipation ability. MANCOVA showed that high-skill players demonstrated superior anticipatory performance compared with low-skill players, who in turn were better than physically disabled spectators. ANOVA showed that high-skill players demonstrated superior recall performance on structured trials only. Also, low-skill players were significantly better than physically disabled spectators on the structured trials. MANCOVA showed that high-skill players were better at recognizing structured and unstructured trials. No differences were found between low-skill players and physically disabled spectators. It appears that high-skill players possess a larger and more elaborate declarative knowledge base. Thus, declarative knowledge is a constituent of skill rather than a by-product of experience.

Item Type: Article
Research Institute, Centre or Group: Centre for Sports Engineering Research
Depositing User: Carole Harris
Date Deposited: 07 Apr 2011 11:27
Last Modified: 07 Apr 2011 11:27
URI: http://shura.shu.ac.uk/id/eprint/3319

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