The manipulation of vision during the powerlift squat: exploring the boundaries of the specificity of learning hypothesis

BENNETT, S J and DAVIDS, K (1995). The manipulation of vision during the powerlift squat: exploring the boundaries of the specificity of learning hypothesis. Research quarterly for exercise and sport, 66 (3), 210-218.

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Abstract

The available information for controlling a multidegree-of-freedom sport action was manipulated in 2 experiments. In the first, 10 intermediate lifters were participants; for the second, 8 skilled and 8 less skilled lifters were observed. Three single repetitions of a powerlift squat were performed under 3 vision conditions (i.e., full, ambient, no vision). The less skilled and intermediate lifters' technical performance decreased significantly with the removal of visual information. There was no detrimental effect in the skilled group. Despite the differing information constraints, skilled lifters exhibited a high level of positioning accuracy and timing consistency across conditions. These data fail to support the theoretical predictions of the specificity of learning hypothesis. The differences between the task constraints in this study and those in manual aiming investigations may represent a boundary to the current propositions of the specificity of learning hypothesis.

Item Type: Article
Research Institute, Centre or Group: Centre for Sports Engineering Research
Depositing User: Carole Harris
Date Deposited: 07 Apr 2011 11:29
Last Modified: 07 Apr 2011 11:29
URI: http://shura.shu.ac.uk/id/eprint/3318

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