Modern-day slavery? The work-life conflict of domestic workers in Nigeria

ADISA, Toyin Ajibade, ADEKOYA, Olatunji David and OKOYA, Olajumoke (2021). Modern-day slavery? The work-life conflict of domestic workers in Nigeria. Gender in Management: An International Journal, 36 (4), 519-535.

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Official URL: https://www.emerald.com/insight/content/doi/10.110...
Link to published version:: https://doi.org/10.1108/gm-02-2020-0054
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    Abstract

    Purpose The trend of domestic employment thrives almost in every society. It is most common in developing countries and Nigeria is no exception. This paper aims to examine the nature of the role of a domestic worker in Nigeria and the work-life conflict issues involved in such work. Design/methodology/approach This study uses a qualitative research approach to examine the nature of the role of domestic workers and the associated work-life conflict issues. Findings The findings show that the nature of the jobs of domestic workers in Nigeria gives rise to a situation of modern-day slavery in which an employee works without a formal employment contract, with little or no rights to private time. Long and unstructured working hours, employers’ perceptions about domestic workers and a huge workload fuel and exacerbate work-life conflict amongst domestic workers in Nigeria. Research limitations/implications The extent to which the findings of this research can be generalised is constrained by the limited and selected sample of the research and the research context. Practical implications The primacy of the employer over the employee in domestic employment means that both time and work-based conflicts continue to buffer work-life conflict if domestic workers’ working hours remain unscheduled and their employers’ perceptions about them remain unchanged. This invariably has a negative impact on the domestic workers’ health and productivity. Therefore, domestic employment should be regulated by law and domestic workers should be treated like other formal employees. Originality/value This study contributes to the debates on the work-life conflict by highlighting the nature of the role of domestic workers in a non-western context, Nigeria and provides a nuanced insight into the work-life conflict issues involved in such work. The findings add conceptual thought and empirical evidence to the debate on work-life conflict.

    Item Type: Article
    Uncontrolled Keywords: 1503 Business and Management; Business & Management
    Identification Number: https://doi.org/10.1108/gm-02-2020-0054
    Page Range: 519-535
    SWORD Depositor: Symplectic Elements
    Depositing User: Symplectic Elements
    Date Deposited: 13 Sep 2022 17:39
    Last Modified: 13 Sep 2022 17:39
    URI: https://shura.shu.ac.uk/id/eprint/30499

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