Gender apartheid: The challenges of breaking into “man's world”

ADISA, Toyin Ajibade, GBADAMOSI, Gbolahan and ADEKOYA, Olatunji David (2021). Gender apartheid: The challenges of breaking into “man's world”. Gender, Work & Organization, 28 (6), 2216-2234.

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Official URL: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/g...
Link to published version:: https://doi.org/10.1111/gwao.12736
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    Abstract

    Drawing on feminist/gender theory and the notion that women self-allocate to occupations with which they identify, this study examines the challenges confronted by women working in male-dominated occupations in a highly patriarchal setting. The findings reveal that women working in “male-typed” occupations in Nigeria are “lone wolves” in a marginal revolution. They experience social ostracism, impaired spousal relationships, and a lack of support from friends and family. Furthermore, the entrenchment of patriarchal culture, the requirement of physical strength, and the lack of trust on the part of clients pose significant barriers to their success in male-dominated professions. These problems further breed and reinforce occupational gender segregation. The prospects of reducing occupational gender segregation and the underrepresentation of women in “male-typed” occupations appear slim due to cultural beliefs and the patriarchal orientation in the study context.

    Item Type: Article
    Uncontrolled Keywords: Gender Studies; 1503 Business and Management; 1608 Sociology; 1699 Other Studies in Human Society
    Identification Number: https://doi.org/10.1111/gwao.12736
    Page Range: 2216-2234
    SWORD Depositor: Symplectic Elements
    Depositing User: Symplectic Elements
    Date Deposited: 13 Sep 2022 15:36
    Last Modified: 20 Sep 2022 11:07
    URI: http://shura.shu.ac.uk/id/eprint/30497

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