Organisational socialisation theory. Integrating outsourced FM employees into organisations

ADERIYE, Oluwatoyin Yetunde (2021). Organisational socialisation theory. Integrating outsourced FM employees into organisations. In: DANIVSKA, Vitalija and APPEL-MEULENBROEK, Rianne, (eds.) A Handbook of Management Theories and Models for Office Environments and Services. Transdisciplinary workplace research and management . London, Routledge, 220-231.

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Official URL: https://www.taylorfrancis.com/chapters/oa-edit/10....
Open Access URL: https://www.taylorfrancis.com/chapters/oa-edit/10.... (Published version)
Link to published version:: https://doi.org/10.1201/9781003128786-19
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    Abstract

    Socialisation provides new recruits with a set pattern of behaviour they can emulate to enable them to blend into the organisation (Buchanan, 2010). In essence, organisational socialisation is the key to ensuring a seamless entry of newly employed staff. Organisational socialisation enables staff, both internal and outsourced, to imbibe the culture of the organisation in which they work, which then enables them to fit in easily, quickly, and seamlessly and deliver a higher and better level of service to their customers. Where this is done properly, organisational socialisation is critical to supporting a higher person-organisation fit between outsourced employees and the client organisation, improving satisfaction for the client, service provider and the employee. A model is proposed to outline how this can be done in organisations with outsourced employees.

    Item Type: Book Section
    Uncontrolled Keywords: Work design
    Identification Number: https://doi.org/10.1201/9781003128786-19
    Page Range: 220-231
    SWORD Depositor: Symplectic Elements
    Depositing User: Symplectic Elements
    Date Deposited: 22 Mar 2022 16:11
    Last Modified: 22 Mar 2022 16:15
    URI: http://shura.shu.ac.uk/id/eprint/29974

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