Overweight, obesity and excessive weight gain in pregnancy as risk factors for adverse pregnancy outcomes: A narrative review

LANGLEY‐EVANS, Simon C., PEARCE, Jo and ELLIS, Sarah (2022). Overweight, obesity and excessive weight gain in pregnancy as risk factors for adverse pregnancy outcomes: A narrative review. Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics.

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Official URL: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jhn.12...
Open Access URL: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/epdf/10.1111/j... (Published version)
Link to published version:: https://doi.org/10.1111/jhn.12999
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    Abstract

    Abstract: The global prevalence of overweight and obesity in pregnancy is rising and this represents a significant challenge for the management of pregnancy and delivery. Women who have a pre‐pregnancy body mass index greater than 25 kg m–2 are more likely than those with a body mass index in the ideal range (20–24.99 kg m–2) to have problems conceiving a child and are at greater risk of miscarriage and stillbirth. All pregnancy complications are more likely with overweight, obesity and excessive gestational weight gain, including those that pose a significant threat to the lives of mothers and babies. Labour complications arise more often when pregnancies are complicated by overweight and obesity. Pregnancy is a stage of life when women have greater openness to messages about their lifestyle and health. It is also a time when they come into greater contact with health professionals. Currently management of pregnancy weight gain and the impact of overweight tends to be poor, although a number of research studies have demonstrated that appropriate interventions based around dietary change can be effective in controlling weight gain and reducing the risk of pregnancy complications. The development of individualised and flexible plans for avoiding adverse outcomes of obesity in pregnancy will require investment in training of health professionals and better integration into normal antenatal care.

    Item Type: Article
    Additional Information: ** Article version: VoR ** From Wiley via Jisc Publications Router ** Licence for VoR version of this article: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ **Journal IDs: issn 0952-3871; issn 1365-277X **Article IDs: publisher-id: jhn12999 **History: published 20-03-2022; accepted 22-02-2022; submitted 15-11-2021
    Uncontrolled Keywords: INVITED REVIEW, gestational diabetes, obesity, pre‐eclampsia, pregnancy, stillbirth
    Identification Number: https://doi.org/10.1111/jhn.12999
    SWORD Depositor: Colin Knott
    Depositing User: Colin Knott
    Date Deposited: 23 Mar 2022 12:18
    Last Modified: 23 Mar 2022 12:18
    URI: http://shura.shu.ac.uk/id/eprint/29968

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