Soiled airway tracheal intubation and the effectiveness of decontamination by paramedics: a randomised controlled manikin study protocol.

PILBERY, Richard, TEARE, M Dawn and MILLINS, Mark (2018). Soiled airway tracheal intubation and the effectiveness of decontamination by paramedics: a randomised controlled manikin study protocol. Br Paramed J, 3 (3), 16-22.

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    Abstract

    Vomiting and regurgitation are commonly encountered in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest with a reported incidence of 20-30%. Arguably, tracheal intubation is the preferred airway management technique in patients with ongoing airway contamination, but there is evidence that this is difficult to achieve when the airway is soiled. In addition, traditional suctioning techniques have been criticised, and training in the management of contaminated airways is limited. If standard suctioning techniques are not sufficient to maintain a clear airway and provide ventilation, then these patients will die, irrespective of the quality of chest compressions and the timeliness of defibrillation. This has led to the development of a combined suction/laryngoscopy technique to facilitate intubation, known as Suction Assisted Laryngoscopy and Airway Decontamination, and the creation of modified airway manikins to allow for practice in these techniques. However, to date there has only been one study specifically looking at the Suction Assisted Laryngoscopy and Airway Decontamination technique, and the outcomes were self-reported confidence measures of trainees in using the technique. The primary objective of Soiled Airway Tracheal Intubation and the Effectiveness of Decontamination is to determine the difference between paramedic first-pass intubation success, before and after Suction Assisted Laryngoscopy and Airway Decontamination training, in a simulated soiled airway. The primary outcome is the difference in proportions of paramedic first-pass intubation success, before and after Suction Assisted Laryngoscopy and Airway Decontamination training. Paramedic recruitment commenced in July 2018 and the study will enrol 154 paramedics by the end of 2018. The results of this study will contribute to the evidence relating to the Suction Assisted Laryngoscopy and Airway Decontamination technique.

    Item Type: Article
    Uncontrolled Keywords: airway management; paramedic; suction assisted laryngoscopy and decontamination (SALAD); tracheal intubation
    Identification Number: https://doi.org/10.29045/14784726.2018.12.3.3.16
    Page Range: 16-22
    SWORD Depositor: Symplectic Elements
    Depositing User: Symplectic Elements
    Date Deposited: 18 May 2022 15:41
    Last Modified: 18 May 2022 15:41
    URI: http://shura.shu.ac.uk/id/eprint/29949

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