Examination of the translocation of sulfonylurea herbicides in sunflower plants by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation mass spectrometry imaging

ANDERSON, D. M. G., CAROLAN, V. A., CROSLAND, S., SHARPLES, K. R. and CLENCH, M. R. (2010). Examination of the translocation of sulfonylurea herbicides in sunflower plants by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation mass spectrometry imaging. Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry, 24 (22), 3309-3319.

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Link to published version:: 10.1002/rcm.4767

Abstract

Pesticides are widely used in agriculture to control weeds, pests and diseases. Successful control is dependent on the compound reaching the target site within the organism after spray or soil application. Conventional methods for determining uptake and movement of herbicides and pesticides include autoradiography, liquid scintillation and chromatographic techniques such as high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Autoradiography using radiolabelled compounds provides the best indication of a compound's movement within the plant system. Autoradiography is an established technique but it relies on the synthesis of radiolabelled compounds. The distribution of four sulfonylurea herbicides in sunflower plants has been studied 24 h after foliar application. The use of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI-MSI) images of protonated molecules and fragment ions (resulting from fragmentation at the urea bond within the sulfonylurea herbicides) has provided evidence for translocation above and below the application point. The translocation of nicosulfuron and azoxystrobin within the same plant system has also been demonstrated following their application to the plant stem. This study provides evidence that MALDI-MSI has great potential as an analytical technique to detect and assess the foliar, root and stem uptake of agrochemicals, and to reveal their distribution through the plant once absorbed and translocated.

Item Type: Article
Research Institute, Centre or Group: Biomedical Research Centre
Identification Number: 10.1002/rcm.4767
Depositing User: Sarah Ward
Date Deposited: 19 Jan 2011 16:45
Last Modified: 19 Jan 2011 16:45
URI: http://shura.shu.ac.uk/id/eprint/2981

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