The Edinburgh claudication questionnaire has poor diagnostic accuracy in people with intermittent claudication

IBEGGAZENE, Saïd, STIRRUP, Andrew, PYMER, Sean, PALMER, Joanne, CAI, Paris L., SMITH, George E. and CHETTER, Ian C. (2022). The Edinburgh claudication questionnaire has poor diagnostic accuracy in people with intermittent claudication. Vascular.

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Official URL: https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/170853812...
Open Access URL: https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/pdf/10.1177/17085... (Published version)
Link to published version:: https://doi.org/10.1177/17085381211059665
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    Abstract

    Background The screening and diagnosis of intermittent claudication is a challenging process and often relies on the expertise of specialist vascular clinicians. We sought to investigate the diagnostic performance of the Edinburgh Claudication Questionnaire (ECQ) as a screening tool for referrals of suspected intermittent claudication from primary to secondary care. Method Prospectively, 100 referrals from primary care with a stated diagnosis or query regarding intermittent claudication were recruited. All participants who completed the ECQ, underwent an anklebrachial pressure index (ABPI) assessment and treadmill exercise testing. Outcomes of the ECQ were compared to clinical diagnoses of intermittent claudication. Results The ECQ had a sensitivity of 46.8% (95% CI: 27–65%), specificity of 63.2% (95% CI: 43–82%) and accuracy of 53.0% (95% CI: 43–63%). The diagnostic performance was not changed by combining the ECQ with a positive ABPI or post-exercise ABPI outcome for PAD. Conclusion The ECQ had a poor diagnostic performance in this cohort. Considering the results found here and in other recent studies, the utility of the ECQ as a screening tool and epidemiological survey tool must be questioned. Novel, low-resource diagnostic tools are needed in this population.

    Item Type: Article
    Uncontrolled Keywords: Cardiovascular System & Hematology; 1102 Cardiorespiratory Medicine and Haematology
    Identification Number: https://doi.org/10.1177/17085381211059665
    SWORD Depositor: Symplectic Elements
    Depositing User: Symplectic Elements
    Date Deposited: 11 Feb 2022 15:04
    Last Modified: 14 Feb 2022 09:49
    URI: http://shura.shu.ac.uk/id/eprint/29724

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