The impact of Baby Friendly Initiative accreditation: An overview of systematic reviews

FAIR, Frankie J., MORRISON, Alison and SOLTANI, Hora (2021). The impact of Baby Friendly Initiative accreditation: An overview of systematic reviews. Maternal & Child Nutrition.

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Official URL: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/mcn.13...
Open Access URL: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/epdf/10.1111/m... (Published version)
Link to published version:: https://doi.org/10.1111/mcn.13216
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    Abstract

    Abstract: Despite its reported benefits, breastfeeding rates are low globally, and support systems such as the Baby Friendly Initiative (BFI) have been established to support healthy infant feeding practices and infant bonding. Increasingly reviews are being undertaken to assess the overall impact of BFI accreditation. A systematic synthesis of current reviews has therefore been carried out to examine the state of literature on the effects of BFI accreditation. A systematic search of CINAHL, MEDLINE, Maternal and Infant Health, Scopus, the Cochrane Library and PROSPERO was undertaken. Study selection, data extraction and critical appraisal of included reviews using the AMSTAR‐2 tool were undertaken by two authors, with disagreements resolved through discussion with the third author. Due to heterogeneity, a narrative synthesis of findings was applied. Fourteen reviews met the inclusion criteria. Overall confidence in the results of the review was rated as high for three reviews, low for two reviews and critically low for nine reviews. Most evidence suggests some increase in breastfeeding initiation, exclusivity and duration of breastfeeding, and one main trial suggests decreased gastrointestinal infection and allergic dermatitis in infants. However, overall certainty in the evidence was rated as very low across all outcomes due to concerns over risk of bias within and heterogeneity between the original studies. More contemporary, good‐quality randomised controlled trials or well‐controlled prospective comparative cohorts are required to better evaluate the impact of full BFI accreditation, with particular attention paid to the context of the research and to long‐term maternal and infant health outcomes.

    Item Type: Article
    Additional Information: ** Article version: VoR ** From Wiley via Jisc Publications Router ** Licence for VoR version of this article: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ **Journal IDs: issn 1740-8695; issn 1740-8709 **Article IDs: publisher-id: mcn13216 **History: published 01-06-2021; accepted 06-05-2021; rev-recd 03-04-2021; submitted 27-01-2021
    Uncontrolled Keywords: REVIEW ARTICLE, REVIEW ARTICLES, baby friendly initiative, breast feeding, breast milk, overview of reviews
    Identification Number: https://doi.org/10.1111/mcn.13216
    SWORD Depositor: Colin Knott
    Depositing User: Colin Knott
    Date Deposited: 03 Jun 2021 16:09
    Last Modified: 03 Jun 2021 16:15
    URI: http://shura.shu.ac.uk/id/eprint/28708

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