Respiration Measurement in a Simulated Setting Incorporating the Internet of Things

ABDULQADER, Tareq, SAATCHI, Reza and ELPHICK, Heather (2021). Respiration Measurement in a Simulated Setting Incorporating the Internet of Things. Technologies, 9 (2).

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Official URL: https://www.mdpi.com/2227-7080/9/2/30
Link to published version:: https://doi.org/10.3390/technologies9020030
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    Abstract

    The Internet of Things (IoT) in healthcare has gained significant attention in recent years. This study demonstrates an adaptation of IoT in healthcare by illustrating a method of respiration rate measurement from a platform that simulates breathing. Respiration rate is a crucial physiological measure in monitoring critically ill patients. The devised approach, with further development, may be suitable for integration into neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) to measure infants’ respiration rate. A potential advantage of this method is that it monitors respiration using a wireless non-contact method and could add benefits such as preservation of skin integrity. The paper aimed to assess the accuracy of an IoT-integrated ultrasound (US)-based method for measuring respiration rate. Chest movement due to respiration was simulated by a platform with a controllable moving surface. The magnitude and frequency of the movements were accurately controlled by a signal generator. The surface movements were tracked using US as a reliable and cost-effective technology. ESP8266 NodeMCU was used to wirelessly record the US signal and ThingSpeak and Matlab© were used to analyze and visualize the data in the cloud. A close relationship between the measured rate of the simulated respiration and the actual frequency was observed. The study demonstrated a possible adaption of IoT for respiration rate measurement, however further work will be needed to ensure security and reliability of data handling before use of the system in medical environments.

    Item Type: Article
    Identification Number: https://doi.org/10.3390/technologies9020030
    SWORD Depositor: Symplectic Elements
    Depositing User: Symplectic Elements
    Date Deposited: 26 Apr 2021 10:09
    Last Modified: 26 Apr 2021 10:15
    URI: http://shura.shu.ac.uk/id/eprint/28570

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