Nano-biomimetic drug delivery vehicles: potential approaches for COVID-19 treatment

WITIKA, Bwalya A., MAKONI, Pedzisai A., MWEETWA, Larry L., NTEMI, Pascal V., CHIKUKWA, Melissa T. R., MATAFWALI, Scott K., MWILA, Chiluba, MUDENDA, Steward, KATANDULA, Jonathan and WALKER, Roderick B. (2020). Nano-biomimetic drug delivery vehicles: potential approaches for COVID-19 treatment. Molecules, 25 (24), e5952.

[img]
Preview
PDF
molecules-25-05952.pdf - Published Version
Creative Commons Attribution.

Download (1MB) | Preview
Open Access URL: https://www.mdpi.com/1420-3049/25/24/5952/htm (Published version)
Link to published version:: https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules25245952
Related URLs:

    Abstract

    The current COVID-19 pandemic has tested the resolve of the global community with more than 35 million infections worldwide and numbers increasing with no cure or vaccine available to date. Nanomedicines have an advantage of providing enhanced permeability and retention and have been extensively studied as targeted drug delivery strategies for the treatment of different disease. The role of monocytes, erythrocytes, thrombocytes, and macrophages in diseases, including infectious and inflammatory diseases, cancer, and atherosclerosis, are better understood and have resulted in improved strategies for targeting and in some instances mimicking these cell types to improve therapeutic outcomes. Consequently, these primary cell types can be exploited for the purposes of serving as a “Trojan horse” for targeted delivery to identified organs and sites of inflammation. State of the art and potential utilization of nanocarriers such as nanospheres/nanocapsules, nanocrystals, liposomes, solid lipid nanoparticles/nano-structured lipid carriers, dendrimers, and nanosponges for biomimicry and/or targeted delivery of bioactives to cells are reported herein and their potential use in the treatment of COVID-19 infections discussed. Physicochemical properties, viz., hydrophilicity, particle shape, surface charge, composition, concentration, the use of different target-specific ligands on the surface of carriers, and the impact on carrier efficacy and specificity are also discussed.

    Item Type: Article
    Additional Information: ** From MDPI via Jisc Publications Router ** Licence for this article: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ **Journal IDs: eissn 1420-3049 **History: published 16-12-2020; accepted 10-12-2020
    Uncontrolled Keywords: biomimetic drug delivery, SARS-CoV-2, COVID-19, nanotechnology, cytokine storm syndrome, nanomedicine
    Identification Number: https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules25245952
    Page Range: e5952
    SWORD Depositor: Colin Knott
    Depositing User: Colin Knott
    Date Deposited: 21 Dec 2020 16:06
    Last Modified: 17 Mar 2021 17:32
    URI: http://shura.shu.ac.uk/id/eprint/27844

    Actions (login required)

    View Item View Item

    Downloads

    Downloads per month over past year

    View more statistics