Influence of microalloying elements (Ti, Nb) and nitrogen concentrations on precipitation of pipeline steels—A thermodynamic approach

AMINORROAYA YAMINI, Sima (2021). Influence of microalloying elements (Ti, Nb) and nitrogen concentrations on precipitation of pipeline steels—A thermodynamic approach. Engineering Reports, 3 (7).

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Official URL: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/e...
Open Access URL: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/epdf/10.1002/e... (Published version)
Link to published version:: https://doi.org/10.1002/eng2.12337
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    Abstract

    A CALculation of PHase Diagrams (CALPHAD) approach was used to study the precipitation of nitrides and carbonitrides in pipeline steels, aligned with new developments of complex chemical compositions and thermomechanical processing of High Strength Low Alloyed (HSLA) Steels. This is in response to growing demand for improved mechanical and chemical properties, manufacturing flexibility and reduced production cost. The calculated results indicated that the precipitation temperatures of nitrides in Ti‐Nb microalloyed steels increased by titanium concentration, while the niobium concentration significantly increased the precipitation temperature of niobium carbonitrides. Carbonitride precipitates formed at much lower temperatures (∼100 K) in low carbon steels (<0.03 wt%) than the high carbon steels (>0.1 wt%), suggesting precipitates larger in size. This is in good agreement with independent experimental data from the literatures, where austenite grain growth was studied in similar steel compositions. Although the dissolution and growth of precipitates are controlled kinetically, these results proved that the thermodynamic calculation can efficiently predict compositions and sequence of precipitation in chemically complex systems, guiding more accurate designs of experiments to identify critical temperatures of grain coarsening during reheating, recrystallisation during hot rolling, and transformation during cooling. This can minimize the number of tests required to obtain optimum chemical compositions and heat treatment procedures.

    Item Type: Article
    Identification Number: https://doi.org/10.1002/eng2.12337
    SWORD Depositor: Symplectic Elements
    Depositing User: Symplectic Elements
    Date Deposited: 15 Dec 2020 16:14
    Last Modified: 12 Jul 2021 16:30
    URI: http://shura.shu.ac.uk/id/eprint/27802

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