Using the theory of planned behaviour and implementation intentions to reduce binge drinking in new university students

NORMAN, P., WEBB, T.L. and MILLINGS, Abigail (2019). Using the theory of planned behaviour and implementation intentions to reduce binge drinking in new university students. Psychology and Health, 34 (4), 478-496.

[img]
Preview
PDF
Millings-Using_Theory_Planned(AM).pdf - Accepted Version
All rights reserved.

Download (463kB) | Preview
Official URL: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/08870...
Link to published version:: https://doi.org/10.1080/08870446.2018.1544369
Related URLs:

    Abstract

    © 2019, © 2019 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. Objective: Excessive alcohol consumption, including binge drinking, increases when students enter university. This study tests whether combining messages targeting theory of planned behaviour (TPB) constructs with if-then plans (i.e. implementation intentions) to avoid binge drinking reduces binge drinking in new university students. Design: One month after starting university, students (N = 407) were randomly assigned to condition in a 2 (TPB messages) × 2 (implementation intentions) factorial design. Main Outcome Measures: Cognitions about binge drinking were assessed immediately post-intervention. Frequency of binge drinking was assessed at one-month follow-up (n = 205). Results: Participants who viewed the messages had significantly weaker intentions to engage in binge drinking and less favourable cognitions about binge drinking (affective attitude, descriptive norms, and self-efficacy) than those who did not view the messages. In addition, participants who formed an implementation intention to avoid binge drinking reported significantly fewer instances of binge drinking at follow-up. Conclusion: The findings provide some support for the use of interventions based on the TPB to reduce intentions to engage in binge drinking and for forming implementation intentions to reduce the frequency of binge drinking in new university students. No evidence was found for the synergistic effect of combining the two interventions.

    Item Type: Article
    Uncontrolled Keywords: Heavy episodic drinking; college; experiment; intervention; online; randomised controlled trial; Adolescent; Adult; Alcohol Drinking in College; Binge Drinking; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Humans; Intention; Male; Psychological Theory; Students; Surveys and Questionnaires; Universities; Young Adult; Humans; Follow-Up Studies; Intention; Psychological Theory; Students; Universities; Adolescent; Adult; Female; Male; Young Adult; Binge Drinking; Surveys and Questionnaires; Alcohol Drinking in College; 1302 Curriculum and Pedagogy; 1701 Psychology; Clinical Psychology
    Identification Number: https://doi.org/10.1080/08870446.2018.1544369
    Page Range: 478-496
    SWORD Depositor: Symplectic Elements
    Depositing User: Symplectic Elements
    Date Deposited: 12 May 2021 10:31
    Last Modified: 12 May 2021 10:45
    URI: http://shura.shu.ac.uk/id/eprint/27726

    Actions (login required)

    View Item View Item

    Downloads

    Downloads per month over past year

    View more statistics