Mindfulness interventions reduce blood pressure in patients with non-communicable diseases: A systematic review and meta-analysis

INTARAKAMHANG, Ungsinun, MACASKILL, Ann and PRASITTICHOK, Pitchada (2020). Mindfulness interventions reduce blood pressure in patients with non-communicable diseases: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Heliyon, 6 (4), e03834.

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Link to published version:: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.heliyon.2020.e03834
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    Abstract

    Purpose Mindfulness based interventions (MBIs) are an emerging area of empirical study, not only in positive psychology, but also in clinical health care. This research aims to synthesize the evidence about whether MBIs reduce blood pressure (BP) in patients with non-communicable diseases (NCDs). Methods Relevant studies were identified via PubMed, the Cochrane Library, Embase and the CINAHL database between 2009 and 2019. The papers selected focused on mindfulness and the effect of these on the BP of patients with NCDs. The change in SBP and DBP were meta-analyzed, stratified by type of intervention (Breathing awareness meditation (BAM), Mindfulness Meditation (MM), and Mindfulness-based Stress Reduction (MBSR). Results Fourteen articles met eligibility criteria and were included in the final review. Among the studies using the type and duration of intervention, systolic BP was reduced after the mindfulness-based stress reduction for 8 weeks (-6.90 mmHg [95% CI: -10.82, -2.97], p < .050), followed by the breathing awareness meditation for 12 weeks (-4.10 mmHg [95% CI: -7.54, -0.66], p < .050) and the mindfulness-based intervention for 8 weeks (-2.69 mmHg [95% CI: -3.90, -1.49], p < .050) whereas diastolic BP was reduced after the mindfulness-based stress reduction for 8 weeks (-2.45 mmHg [95% CI: -3.74, -1.17], p < .050) and the mindfulness-based intervention for 8 weeks (-2.24 mmHg [95% CI: -3.22, -1.26], p < .050). Conclusion MBIs can provide effective alternative therapies to assist in blood pressure reduction for patients with NCDs.

    Item Type: Article
    Additional Information: ** Article version: VoR ** From Elsevier via Jisc Publications Router ** Licence for VoR version of this article starting on 22-04-2020: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/ **Journal IDs: issn 24058440 **History: issue date 30-04-2020; published_online 28-04-2020; accepted 21-04-2020
    Identification Number: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.heliyon.2020.e03834
    Page Range: e03834
    SWORD Depositor: Colin Knott
    Depositing User: Colin Knott
    Date Deposited: 01 May 2020 10:22
    Last Modified: 01 May 2020 10:30
    URI: http://shura.shu.ac.uk/id/eprint/26219

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