Pan-Britain, mixed-methods study of multidisciplinary teams teaching parents to manage children's long-term kidney conditions at home: Study protocol

SWALLOW, Veronica, ALLEN, D., WILLIAMS, J., SMITH, T., CROSIER, J., LAMBERT, H., QIZALBASH, L., WIRZ, L. and WEBB, N.J.A. (2012). Pan-Britain, mixed-methods study of multidisciplinary teams teaching parents to manage children's long-term kidney conditions at home: Study protocol. BMC Health Services Research, 12 (1), p. 33.

[img]
Preview
PDF
1472-6963-12-33.pdf - Published Version
Creative Commons Attribution.

Download (402kB) | Preview
Official URL: https://bmchealthservres.biomedcentral.com/article...
Link to published version:: https://doi.org/10.1186/1472-6963-12-33
Related URLs:

    Abstract

    Background: Care of children and young people (children) with long-term kidney conditions is usually managed by multidisciplinary teams. Published guidance recommends that whenever possible children with long-term conditions remain at home, meaning parents may be responsible for performing the majority of clinical care-giving. Multidisciplinary team members, therefore, spend considerable time promoting parents' learning about care-delivery and monitoring care-giving. However, this parent-educative aspect of clinicians' role is rarely articulated in the literature so little evidence exists to inform professionals' parent-teaching interventions. Methods/Design. This ongoing study addresses this issue using a combination of quantitative and qualitative methods involving the twelve children's kidney units in England, Scotland and Wales. Phase I involves a survey of multidisciplinary team members' parent-teaching interventions using:. i) A telephone-administered questionnaire to determine: the numbers of professionals from different disciplines in each team, the information/skills individual professionals relay to parents and the teaching strategies/interventions they use. Data will be managed using SPSS to produce descriptive statistics. ii) Digitally-recorded, qualitative group or individual interviews with multidisciplinary team members to explore their accounts of the parent-teaching component of their role. Interviews will be transcribed anonymously and analysed using Framework Technique. Sampling criteria will be derived from analysis to identify one/two unit(s) for subsequent in-depth study. Phase II involves six prospective, ethnographic case-studies of professional-parent interactions during parent-teaching encounters. Parents of six children with a long-term kidney condition will be purposively sampled according to their child's age, diagnosis, ethnicity and the clinical care-giving required; snowball sampling will identify the professionals involved in each case-study. Participants will provide signed consent; data gathering will involve a combination of: minimally-obtrusive observations in the clinical setting and families' homes; de-briefing interviews with participants to obtain views on selected interactions; focussed 'verbatim' field-notes, and case-note reviews. Data gathering will focus on communication between parents and professionals as parents learn care-giving skills and knowledge. Interviews will be digitally recorded and transcribed anonymously. Discussion. This study involves an iterative-inductive approach and will provide a unique, detailed insight into the social context in which professionals teach and parents learn; it will inform professionals' parent-educative roles, educational curricula, and health care policy. © 2012 Swallow et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

    Item Type: Article
    Uncontrolled Keywords: Adolescent; Caregivers; Child; Child, Preschool; Female; Home Nursing; Humans; Infant; Kidney Diseases; Long-Term Care; Male; Parents; Patient Care Team; Professional-Family Relations; Prospective Studies; Qualitative Research; United Kingdom; Humans; Kidney Diseases; Long-Term Care; Home Nursing; Prospective Studies; Parents; Professional-Family Relations; Qualitative Research; Adolescent; Child; Child, Preschool; Infant; Caregivers; Patient Care Team; Female; Male; United Kingdom; 1117 Public Health and Health Services; 0807 Library and Information Studies; Health Policy & Services
    Identification Number: https://doi.org/10.1186/1472-6963-12-33
    Page Range: p. 33
    SWORD Depositor: Symplectic Elements
    Depositing User: Symplectic Elements
    Date Deposited: 15 May 2020 15:18
    Last Modified: 15 May 2020 15:30
    URI: http://shura.shu.ac.uk/id/eprint/25914

    Actions (login required)

    View Item View Item

    Downloads

    Downloads per month over past year

    View more statistics