The Big Society and the Conjunction of Crises: Justifying Welfare Reform and Undermining Social Housing

MANZI, Tony (2014). The Big Society and the Conjunction of Crises: Justifying Welfare Reform and Undermining Social Housing. Housing, Theory and Society, 32 (1), 9-24.

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Official URL: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/14036...
Link to published version:: https://doi.org/10.1080/14036096.2014.947172
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    Abstract

    The idea of the “Big Society” can be seen as culmination of a long-standing debate about the regulation of welfare. Situating the concept within governance theory, the article considers how the UK coalition government has justified a radical restructuring of welfare provision, and considers its implications for housing provision. Although drawing on earlier modernization processes, the article contends that the genesis for welfare reform was based on an analysis that the government was forced to respond to a unique conjunction of crises: in morality, the state, ideology and economics. The government has therefore embarked upon a programme, which has served to undermine the legitimacy of the social housing sector (most notably in England), with detrimental consequences for residents and raising significant dilemmas for those working in the housing sector.

    Item Type: Article
    Additional Information: Cited By :10 Export Date: 13 February 2020
    Uncontrolled Keywords: Urban & Regional Planning; 1205 Urban and Regional Planning; 1608 Sociology; 1604 Human Geography
    Identification Number: https://doi.org/10.1080/14036096.2014.947172
    Page Range: 9-24
    SWORD Depositor: Symplectic Elements
    Depositing User: Symplectic Elements
    Date Deposited: 13 May 2020 14:05
    Last Modified: 13 May 2020 14:15
    URI: http://shura.shu.ac.uk/id/eprint/25829

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