Exploratory Study On The Role Of Emotion Regulation In Perceived Valence, Humour, And Beneficial Use Of Depressive Internet Memes In Depression.

AKRAM, Umair, DRABBLE, Jennifer, CAU, Glhenda, HERSHAW, Frayer, ASHILEEN, Rajenthran, LOEW, Mollie, TROMMELEN, Carrisa and ELLIS, Jason (2020). Exploratory Study On The Role Of Emotion Regulation In Perceived Valence, Humour, And Beneficial Use Of Depressive Internet Memes In Depression. Scientific Reports, 10 (899).

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Official URL: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-020-57953-4...
Open Access URL: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-020-57953-4... (Published)
Link to published version:: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-020-57953-4
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    Abstract

    This study examined whether individuals experiencing significant depressive symptoms would differ from non-depressed controls in their interpretation of internet memes related to depression, whilst incorporating the mediating role of emotion regulation difficulty. Forty-three individuals presenting clinically significant depressive symptoms (indicating ≥15 on the PHQ-9) and 56 non-depressed controls (indicating ≤4) rated the emotional valance, humour, relatability, shareability, and mood improving potential of 32 depressive and control (depicting general neutral or positive social commentaries) internet memes. Measures of depression and emotion dysregulation were also completed. The perception of humour, relatability, shareability and mood improving potential of depressive, but not control, memes were all greater amongst individuals with symptoms of depression relative to controls. However, these differences were mediated by deficits in the ability to deploy adaptive emotion regulation strategies. Despite their negative orientation, internet memes related to depression may be beneficial for individuals experiencing consistent symptoms. Specifically, by potentially facilitating: a humorous take on a negative experience and situation; the perception of peer-support through affiliation with others experiencing similar symptoms; and adaptive emotion regulation strategies amongst those with deficits in the ability to deploy such strategies.

    Item Type: Article
    Uncontrolled Keywords: 0601 Biochemistry and Cell Biology; 0299 Other Physical Sciences
    Identification Number: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-020-57953-4
    SWORD Depositor: Symplectic Elements
    Depositing User: Symplectic Elements
    Date Deposited: 17 Jan 2020 14:02
    Last Modified: 30 Mar 2020 17:30
    URI: http://shura.shu.ac.uk/id/eprint/25691

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