Exploring the new participant experience and effect of Lincolnshire's 'Vitality': A community-based physical activity programme for older adults (abstract only)

MIDDLETON, Geoff, HAMBROOK, Robyn, BISHOP, Daniel, CRUST, Lee and BROOM, David (2018). Exploring the new participant experience and effect of Lincolnshire's 'Vitality': A community-based physical activity programme for older adults (abstract only). Journal of Physical Activity and Health, 15 (10), S212-S212.

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    Abstract

    Introduction: Physical activity (PA) benefits older adults. The study aim was to examine the effect of ‘Vitality’: a community-based group physical activity programme for older adults and explore user experiences. Methods: An intervention group, representing new Vitality members (n16, mean age: 69.5 ± 6.5 years), and a control group (n16, mean age: 63±6.3 years) were tested before and after an 8-week period on a range of 1) physical measures: body mass, body mass index, resting heart rate, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, 6-minute walk (6 MWT), 30-second sit to stand, 30-second arm curl, 8-foot up and go (8UG), chair sit and reach (CSR), back scratch, and 2) psychological measures: self-efficacy for exercise, physical activity enjoyment and the quality of life. Semi-structured focus groups were undertaken to explore the facilitators and barriers to attending. Results: There was an interaction between groups and from baseline to 8-weeks in the intervention group the following measures improved: body mass, 73.3 (±8.6) to 71.8 kg (±8.5); 6 MWT, 430.5 (±38.1) to 473.5 m (±37); 8UG, 6.5 (±1) to 6.0 s (±1.1); the CSR, −2.3 (±11.2) to 0.6 cm (±10) (all P < 0.05). No differences were found with the other outcomes. Key themes highlighted facilitators; unique and bespoke, retirement transition, perceived improvements, offer of support networks. Barriers were; misconceptions and assumptions, inconsistent opportunities, accessibility and availability of classes. Conclusion: Participation in Vitality led to several physical and functional benefits for older adults. Importantly, the programme did not regress any aspects of physical or psychological health.

    Item Type: Article
    Uncontrolled Keywords: Public Health; 1106 Human Movement and Sports Sciences; 1302 Curriculum and Pedagogy
    Page Range: S212-S212
    SWORD Depositor: Symplectic Elements
    Depositing User: Symplectic Elements
    Date Deposited: 04 Feb 2020 12:25
    Last Modified: 05 Feb 2020 12:21
    URI: http://shura.shu.ac.uk/id/eprint/25645

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